Gardening Tips For Seniors

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6 Garden Plants that are Easy to Grow

Gardening Tips For Seniors-bromeliads
Bromeliads Flowering Plant

A well-maintained garden dose not only creates an environment that’s beautiful and relaxing but will help in increasing your property’s value while providing a natural habitat for beneficial insects and wildlife.

While working in a garden calls for some effort for its upkeep there are low maintenance plants that will make your time in the garden more enjoyable by making your garden work a breeze.

This is especially important among seniors to avoid the load that can be placed on them. Low maintenance gardening is amazing giving you the desired results as you connect or should I say work hand in hand with nature on the great outdoors

Gardening Tips for Seniors

1. Bromeliads

The planting location.

Bromeliads can grow both out and indoors even on trees growing in low to medium and indirect bright light depending on the species. There are said to be some 2,700 species in this family which makes it large having so many to choose from.

Soil type

The potting soil should be well-drained because bromeliads don’t like wet feet.

Water requirements

Placing water in the center cup though popular will cause rot, watering the potting soil when dry is ideal.

Fertilizing  requirements

Although many species can thrive without fertilizer, the use of 20-20-20 or 10-20-20 will supply the needed nutrients.

Garden pests problems

Garden pests include mites, slugs, snails, weevils, aphids, thrips, and scales. The use of insecticidal soap, soapy water, or horticultural oil will bring aphids, scales, mites, and thrips under control. Control snail with baits or by handpicking and throwing into a bucket of soapy water. The use of Sevin dust will eliminate weevils.

Disease control

Plant Disease can also be avoided if you apply the right practices. Practices such as not allowing water to sit in the center cup especially tap or pump water for long periods of time. Always be mindful never to use a pruner that you have used on an infected plant to prune another plant. This will spread diseases from plant to plant and increase problems.

Pruning procedures

Remove diseased or damaged leaves with a sharp pruner or scissors.

2. ZZ Plants

The planting location.

ZZ plants can be grown indoors as well as outdoors in low to medium or indirect bright light.

Soil type

Any well-drained potting soil is ideal because  ZZ plants are drought-tolerant.

Water requirements

ZZ plants can survive on very little water, the soil should be allowed to dry before giving ZZs another drink.

Fertilizing  requirements

ZZ plants can stand up well without applications of fertilizer but it’s still good to provide your ZZ with a 20-20-20 liquid feed.

Garden pests problems

Garden pests may include aphids and scales which can be easily controlled with insecticidal soap or a solution of soapy water by spraying the leaves and whipping with a cloth.

Disease control

The only issue I have had with ZZ plants is overwatering, be very careful because ZZs don’t like wet feet which can lead to root rot, yellowing, and dropping of the leaves.

Pruning procedures

When removing a whole stem because of damage or disease cut with a sharp pruner from the plant’s base or just above the soil line.

3. Snake Plant

The planting location.

The snake plant or better known as the mother in law tongue can be grown both out and indoors with medium to bright indirect light.

Soil type

Because snake plants are drought-tolerant a soil that’s well-drained is ideal

Water requirements

Allow the soil to dry out before watering again because overwater will lead to root rot.

Fertilizing  requirements

Snake plants can do well on their own without fertilizing but if you want to still fertilizer a basic or balanced fertilizer such as 20-20-20 will provide your snake plants with nutrients.

Garden pests problems

Mealybugs and spider mites are the main pest problems and can be controlled with insecticidal soap or the use of a strong spray of water.

Disease control

Diseases such as red leaf spot and southern blight can become an issue, to bring these diseases under control requires allowing the soil to dry before giving your plant another drink, using soils that drain well, and avoid water getting on the leaves.

Pruning procedures

Remove leaves from the base that may be diseased, damage, overgrown, or hanging and growing away from the plant.

4. Chinese evergreen

The planting location.

Chinese evergreen prefers filtered light to partial shade and can be grown both out and indoors.

Soil type

A well-drained soil or a potting soil that contains perlite and sand is ideal for your evergreen.

Water requirements

Allowing the soil to dry out somewhat and then water again will encourage proper growth.

Fertilizing  requirements

Chinese evergreen will thrive without fertilizer application, but apply 20-20-20 liquid feed twice a year in the spring or summer months will supply the nutrients.

Garden pests problems

Common pests problems include aphids, scales, mealybugs, and spider mites. The use of insecticidal soap or whipping the plant off with soapy water will bring control.

Disease control

Diseases include stem and root rot, control measures include, allowing the soil to dry somewhat before applying water and avoiding overhead irrigation keeping the leaves dry.

Pruning procedures

Leaves that are diseased, damaged, or overgrown can be pruned, when removing leaves go as close to the stem and make the cut.

5. Rubber plant

The planting location.

The rubber plant can be installed both out and indoors and prefer bright indirect light.

Soil type

Rubber plants don’t like wet feet so well-drained soil will work wonders.

Water requirements

The soil of the rubber plant should be moist and not waterlogged which will lead to root rot.

Fertilizing  requirements

A balanced fertilizer such as 10-10-10 will supply the needed nutrients.

Garden pests problems

Insect pests include aphids, scales mealybugs, and spider mites which can be controlled with insecticidal soap or by wiping the leaves with a towel that contains soapy water.

Disease control

The rubber plant is resistant to most diseases, to avoid those diseases they are susceptible to however provide the right amount of water along with avoiding overhead irrigation. Nematodes are another issue, if your rubber plant falls prey to nematodes remove the plant and properly discard it.

Pruning procedures

Leaves that are damaged, diseased or overgrown can be removed with a pruner.

6. Dusty millers

The planting location.

Dusty millers grow best in the full sun but will also thrive in partial shade.

Soil type

Well-drained soil is ideal for this garden beauty.

Water requirements

Allowing the soil to dry a bit then watering again will keep your dusty miller in tip-top shape.

Fertilizing  requirements

A light application of general-purpose fertilizer will help although this plant can thrive without it. Heavy fertilizer applications may result in a plant that’s leggy and weak.

Garden pests problems

Keep an eye out for aphids and slugs, control aphids by washing the leaves with fresh water. Slugs can be handed picked and dump into a bucket of soapy water.

Disease control

Root rot brought on by overwatering is an issue so control moisture by allowing the soil to dry out a bit between watering. Aster yellow may also become an issue.

This disease is brought on by bacteria, control this disease by removing and properly disposing of the plant.

Pruning procedures

Leaves that are damage or overgrown can be removed with a hand pruner.

The final word on gardening tips for seniors

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These listed plants are a few among many that will make garden life easy for seniors. I believe we should beautify our surroundings, creating a home for wildlife while bringing balance to our ecosystem. We should have fun doing it, why because that’s one of the great pleasures of gardening so go for it and create a low maintenance garden it is worth the investment as you reap the rewards.

About the author

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Norman loves being in the garden, both at home and for his job....
he is 'Natures Little helper' being outdoors, growing his vegetables and flowers from an early age.
Now having spent over 22 years in the profession he want to give some of his knowledge to others...
his vast array of hints and tips you will find scattered over this site will help you no end growing plants in your garden.