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Growing and Caring for Aglaonemas Both out and Indoors

Aglaonema In A Basket

Growing and caring for aglaonemas is truly amazing, I have cared for many of these garden beauties on the interior and what I love about aglaonemas is that they are very easy to care for. These plants are not fussy making maintenance a breeze.

Aglaonemas can be grown and cared for both in and outdoors and there are many species of them which gives you the option to choose from. These plants are also known as Chinese evergreens which will work wonders for you so for more on these garden beauties take a trip with me as we explore the fascinating world of aglaonemas which are a garden wonder.

Planting Location

When growing aglaonemas look for an area that is partially shaded because if exposed to the full sun can cause leaf burn.

Soil Type

The soil type should be a well-drained soil which will hold the right amount of moisture but will allow excess water to drain through.

Watering Methods

When watering your aglaonemas give it a good drink then allow the soil to dry before watering again because too much water will cause rot root.

Fertilizing Methods

During the growing season fertilizer your aglaonemas with a slow release plant food. Before applying fertilizer read and follow the manufacturer’s label because the label is the law.

Garden insect pests of aglaonemas

Keep an eye out for these garden insects pests.

  • Aphids
  • MealyBugs
  • Spider Mites
  • Scales

Aphids

Aphids are tiny pared shape insects that cause damage by sucking the plant’s fluids turning the leaves yellow followed by leaf drop. Aphids are among the easiest of garden insect pests to eliminate. A strong spray of water from a garden hose will knock them off your aglaonemas eliminating them however this strong spray of water can also break the leaves.

The use of insecticidal soap will give good results or a homemade remedy which has proven to be effective is soap liquid and water. Add a tablespoon of soap liquid to a gallon of water shake well and apply to a 32 oz spray bottle. When applying this mixture get both the top and the underside of the leaves. Adjust the head or the spray nozzle so that this solution can come out fine and misty getting full coverage.

Coarse droppings will be ineffective. This solution should be applied on a few of the lower leaves to see if it doesn’t have an adverse effect on your aglaonemas, wait for at least a day or 24 hours. If there is no adverse effect then go ahead and spray the entire plant. Wait for seven days and if there are still signs of aphids then repeat the application and follow as was directed.

MealyBugs

Mealybugs are very common among garden insects pest and feed on a host of garden plants. Mealybugs can be easily identified by a white waxy mealy covering that looks somewhat like cotton. These bugs can cause the seem damage as aphids, mites, and scales. The use of insecticidal soap will bring them under control.

Spider Mites

Spider mites are very tiny but can cause huge damage to our garden plants, to know if your aglaonemas have spider mites look for spider web along with your plant taking on a dusty appearance. What you can also do to further test your finding is to place a sheet of white paper under the plant’s leaves and gently shake or tap.

If it is spider mites you will see tiny specks or spots moving around on that sheet of paper and if the infestation is very server you will feel them crawling around on your hands. Spider mites also cause yellowing of the leaves followed by leaf drop, removing the infested leaves along with leaves that are dead and applying insecticidal soap or horticultural oil will bring this garden insect pest under control.

Scales

There are many species of scale insects. These garden pest cause plant injury by injecting their piercing-sucking mouthparts into the plant’s leaves and extracting the plant’s fluids or sap which can lead to yellowing and browning of the foliage.

Scales are tiny insects with bodies that resemble and armor, these garden insects pest remains in a fixed position or motionless but pay that no mine because the damage is being done. This feeding can also lead to sooty mold. Applying neem oil or insecticidal soap will bring these garden insect pests under control.

Disease of aglaonemas

Be on the lookout for these diseases.

  • Fungal Leaf Spot
  • Stem and Root Rot

These diseases are encouraged by fungs brought on by plants that have been heavily watered therefore it is very important to allow the soil to dry out a bit before watering again.

Ideas on where to install aglaonemas

Here are just a few places where to install aglaonemas.

1. Depending on the size of your aglaonemas they can be installed as a back or front drop in a garden plant bed.

2. Six-inch aglaonemas can be installed in hanging baskets and small table containers. Placing them on countertops and other leveled surface will look great.

3. Can be used as a specimen plant.

4. Place large aglaonemas in containers and place the container on either side of your front door entrance.

5. What about placing the container on your porch or patio?

6. Place them in a circular pattern around the trunks of trees.

Growing aglaonemas from containers

A cool way to grow and care for aglaonemas is with the help of containers, the way this is down is to choose a container that will allow your aglaonemas to have room to grow. The container should have drain holes to allow excess water to drain.

The soil should be a good potting soil that drains well, The use of a liquid feed or slow-release fertilizer will offer much help. Before fertilizing read and follow the manufacturer’s label, allow the soil to dry out between watering. Place your aglaonema in an area that gets partial sun, keep an eye out for disease and garden insect pests and treat as stated earlier.

Growing and caring for aglaonemas indoors

Growing these babies indoors is my specialty, I have had much success with the growth and care of these plants on the interior. When growing aglaonemas indoors place the container in an area that gets bright indirect light because direct bright light will burn the plants leaves. The soil should be slightly moist and not waterlogged which can lead to root rot

Fertilizer with a slow release plant food as directed by the label, apart from placing your aglaonemas in an area that gets bright indirect light the room temperature should be above 65 degrees Fahrenheit. To raise the humidity mist the leaves often.

The final word

Aglaonemas are pretty amazing plants which can work wonders, these garden beauties have made a name of themselves. Aglaonemas can be grown both out and indoors, I have worked with them and they are worth the investment so go for it and give them a try trust me you will be so happy that you did.

6 comments

  1. Babsie Wagner says:

    Well, there you have it.  It looks like the reason I was not having the success my friend had with my Aglaonema was because I wasn’t waiting for the soil to become dry before I would water it.  I swear she told me to keep it moist, but my plant was just not doing well.  I’m so glad for your article about how to care for my beautiful plant.  Now I’ll know exactly what to do, and I can’t wait to see the results!

    1. Norman says:

      These plants don’t like wet feet allow the soil to dry then give them another drink. So happy to help and have a good day.

  2. Lynda says:

    I am glad I found this website. I have never had good luck with indoor plants I now know it is because I water them too much.

     I really love how well informed you are and that you would share that knowledge with us is so great. I had heard of making the homemade insect soap before but didn’t know it was just soap and water. 

    I had wondered what caused the white cotton things on my plants and now I know what to do about it. Thank you so much you saved my plants life.

    I was wondering if Castile soap would be okay to use?

    Blessings,

    Lynda

    1. Norman says:

      Hello Lyda so happy to help, as far as Castile is concerned not sure if that will work because I have never tried it. What I do is test it on a small portion of your plants like a few leaves at the bottom if it works then why not also google it before use to make sure. Hope this help.

  3. Peter hanley says:

    The rise of plants like AGLAONEMA is making small garden growing easy for everyone and with insect control as mentioned above it make life possible for this old brown thumb.

    I would also say that you can make a few bob starting them and selling at roadside stalls or family markets teaching others all about nature.
    Peter H

    1. Norman says:

      Hello, Peter so good to see you and thanks so much for your advice, wishing you all the best of success and have a good day.

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